(May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778)

So much myths and hypes have been infused into the Evolution Theory that more deserving (and better substantiated) sciences are often relegated at their expense. Even Charles Darwin has been elevated to an intellectual pedestal which is well-above his achievements. But as an ardent fan of hardcore sciences, I refuse to be swayed. This is because, whoever cared to delve deeply into Taxonomy and Genetics would not study long before realizing that these two sciences have already addressed most of the things that Evolution diehards hold dear. And they did so with more cogent and compelling evidence than Evolution ever tendered. Hence, whenever the issue concerns biodiversity and ancestry, Carl Linnaeus and Gregor Mendel, are my first tier of consultants. Since time immemorial, similarities and differences have been observed in living things. But it was not until the 1730s that Carl Linnaeus used scientifically-based system to classify living organisms. To do this, he improved and adopted the binomial nomenclature methods, which two Swiss brothers, Gaspard and Johann Bauhin, established two centuries prior. Linnaeus published his epoch-making Systema Naturae in 1735. The influential Philosophia Botanica arrived in 1751; followed by Species Plantarum in 1753: which classified every known plant at that time. Apart from being well-received, these three treatises redefined modern biology. And ever since, biologists have adhered to Linnaeus’ methodologies. His taxonomic pathway not only named organisms. It highlighted the characteristics or features of biological importance which members share. Hence, modern classifications (from Kingdom down to Species), are attributed to Linnaeus.

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